Placido Domingo | Operatic performances 

2011 Opera Tampa Gala to honor Placido Domingo

Daniel sings "Veste la Giubba" for Placido Domingo

Opera study with Placido Domingo

"Placido Domingo has helped bring to life every dream I've had since I was a boy studying music."

Between his regular schedule of appearances during 2002-2003, Daniel attended an intensive study program at the Vilar-Domingo Young Artists program in Washington DC.

"Chance of a lifetime to work with the Maestro. To use a line from one of my songs 'This was the moment, the sweetest moment of my life.' "

VIDEO - CBS Early Show (also available on VIDEO page)

Performances 2006 - 2018

2018: Cruzar La Cara De La Luna

“To Cross the Face of the Moon”

"Laurentino, played by Daniel Rodriguez, whose singing and acting proves to be the dramatic anchor of the evening: 

~Loren Lester, reviewer

Daniel Rodríguez and Alba Franco-Cancél in rehearsal for "Cruzar la Cara de la Luna," a mariachi opera about a Mexican man who travels north seeking work, and the family he leaves behind.

2012:  Lt. Pinkerton in "Madama Butterfly"

“it is as if Puccini had written the role for Daniel. He sounds glorious in it.” ~Maestro Carmine Aufiero.

Chelsea Opera welcomes back tenor Daniel Rodriguez in the role of Lt. Pinkerton. Rodriguez made his opera debut in Chelsea Opera's 2006 production of "Pagliacci", which the New York Times wrote, "Mr. Rodriguez has a real voice: beefy, husky, with baritonal colorings."

Tenor Daniel Rodriguez has had so much build-up in the last decade that it was refreshing to actually see him on stage.  The Brooklyn native is best known for his transition from the New York Police Department to a recording career and tutelage from Plácido Domingo.

His teacher's influence was audible: a dark, slightly baritonal tenor. It rang out with spinto power in the big, heroic moments, although the gentle seduction of Butterfly didn't have much in the way of subtlety. For once, the added Act III aria did not seem superfluous, but an expression of genuine heartbreak.

2008 Turridu in Cavalleria Rusticana

Opera of the Hamptons presents Daniel Rodriguez in Cavalleria Rusticana

Soprano Cristina Fontanelli 

"We are very excited  to present this  remarkable tenor"

"It is not often that we have the chance to experience what Placido Domingo describes as, "A beautiful tenor voice and a source of joy to me'. Daniel has also been referred to by a leading conductor as a 'possible natural successor to Carreras, Domingo and Pavarotti, if he decides to focus on an operatic career."  

~Ray Bradbrook

2007 Canio in I Pagliacci

"To have seen Mr. Rodriguez as Canio in Pagliacci was to witness an opera moment....Simply, Daniel Rodriguez’ performance was electrifying, pure magic, pure energy, pure emotion and blazing in glory."

~Paul Joseph Walkowski, 2007 Operaonline.ns

"Best performance by a Leading Male"  by OperaOnline for his portrayal of Canio with

Granite State Opera 

No clowning around: NYC's opera cop belts out 'Pagliacci'

Vocally, "Pagliacci" was thrilling, and never so than when tenor Daniel Rodriguez (famous as New York City's "singing cop") was belting out his big moments as Canio, opera's iconic sad clown. There are plenty in the score, and Rodriguez was in the zone for all of them, with a booming voice that perfectly matched his dramatic approach to the role.

 

Rodriguez, not intimidated by great tenors who've defined the part, made it entirely his own, generating a smoldering and angry intensity that filled the theater even when he wasn't singing. Just the way he threw his hat offstage was menacing, and helped set the stage for the inevitable violent conclusion. ~Jeff Rapsis

2006 Canio in I Pagliacci

"Impossible not to respond to his portrayal""

Debut: Lead tenor role as Canio with Chelsea Opera Company, New York

"He has proven that he has a voice and can use it to passionate effect. He can readily display it as Canio, whose music is histrionic and flashy."

~Clive On, at the Villager.

"When he sang the touchstone aria, "Vesti la giubba," venting Canio's grief and humiliation, you sensed that here was someone pouring out years of pent-up artistic longing."

~Anthony Tommasini, NY Times reviewer

Rick Stockwell photographer